Civil Rights Figure Viola Desmond Is The Face Of Canada's $10 Bill

Civil Rights Figure Viola Desmond Is The Face Of Canada's $10 Bill

Canadian Finance Minister Bill Morneau officially unveiled the bill in Halifax with the assistance of Desmond's sister, Wanda Robson, who noted, "Our family will go down in history - in history, imagine that".

On Thursday, the Bank of Canada unveiled a new bank note featuring civil rights icon Viola Desmond - and visitors to the promotional website can find the video game by repeatedly clicking on the "Spin" button underneath a 3D image of the bill. "But it is an important story, because it shows that standing up for what we believe, whether it's on the step of Parliament Hill or in a movie theatre in New Glasgow, N.S., can make our country and our world a better place for future generations".

"It's a long-awaited sense of belonging for the African Canadian community", said Russell Grosse, executive director of the Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia. "It's lifelike. It's as if she is in this room with this new $10 bill".

The story of Desmond by and large was unknown for half a century, but in recent years the image of this courageous woman appeared on a stamp, and her name is ferry in Halifax harbour.

Desmond's case is credited with playing a role in legally ending segregation in Nova Scotia in 1954. "She's just one of many of us who have suffered".

Apart from being an activist, Desmond was also a beautician and developed her own line of beauty products, Vi's Beauty Products.

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Because she could not see well from the balcony where black patrons were relegated to sit, she sat on the floor level reserved for whites.

The incident happened almost a decade before Rosa Parks famously refused to give up her seat on a segregated bus in Alabama.

Desmond, 32, was dragged out of the theatre by police and jailed for defiantly sitting in the "whites only" section of a film house. Nova Scotia issued a posthumous pardon to her in 2009, decades after her protest and 1965 death.

"Viola Desmond made a special act of courage", - said Isaac, Cain, senior lecturer at Dalhousie University.

"I say thank you, thank you, thank you", Robson continued.

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